bees

Heather Pilatic's blog
By Heather Pilatic,

In the last few weeks beekeepers have reported staggering losses in Minnesota, Nebraska and Ohio after their hives foraged on pesticide-treated corn fields. Indiana too, two years ago. What's going on in the Corn Belt?

Pesticide Action Network's blog
By Pesticide Action Network,

This week PAN released Honey Bees and Pesticides: State of the Sciencea 22-page report on the factors behind colony collapse disorder (CCD) with a sustained focus on the particular role of pesticides. 

Sara Knight

Contact: 
Paul Towers, Pesticide Action Network
916-216-1082, ptowers@panna.org

 

May 8, 2012

Heather Pilatic's blog
By Heather Pilatic,

No farmer in their right mind wants to poison pollinators. When I spoke with one Iowa corn farmer in January and told him about the upcoming release of a Purdue study confirming corn as a major neonicotinoid exposure route for bees, his face dropped with worn exasperation. He looked down for a moment, sighed and said, “You know, I held out for years on buying them GE seeds, but now I can’t get conventional seeds anymore. They just don’t carry ‘em."

This leaves us with two questions: 1) What do GE seeds have to do with neonicotinoids and bees? and 2) How can an Iowa corn farmer find himself feeling unable to farm without poisoning pollinators? In other words, where did U.S. corn cultivation go wrong?

Pesticide Action Network's blog
By Pesticide Action Network,

Scientific evidence continues to mount strengthening the case that neonicotinoid pesticides are indeed key drivers behind colony collapse disorder (CCD). Three new studies out in the past two weeks, including one today, add to the growing body of evidence that implicate pesticides as a critical catalyst behind drastic declines in bee population. 

With beekeepers continuing to lose more than one-third of their hives each year, on average, the research is timely. Yet pesticide manufacturers like Bayer are attacking the science and attempting to delay regulatory action.