Coalition calls for ban on chlorpyrifos

When Environmental Protection Agency officials consider re-registering the neurotoxic chemical chlorpyrifos, Luís Medellín hopes they take into account the health of his parents and three younger sisters, who are regularly impacted by the pesticide as it drifts off orange groves across the street from their home.

The pesticide -- which was banned from use in homes about 10 years ago, but is still sprayed on crops such as oranges, almonds, walnuts, alfalfa and cotton -- has the piercing smell of a skunk or roach spray, Medellín said.

Recent studies have found that exposure to chlorpyrifos in the womb and in early childhood can lead to lasting effects on the brain, including lower IQs, an increased risk of ADHD, and learning disabilities in children, according to the Pesticide Action Network North América.

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