| Pesticide Action Network
Reclaiming the future of food and farming

Ahna Kruzic

Communications Director
Ahna Kruzic

Ahna Kruzic is a community organizer turned communicator and writer from rural southern Iowa. As PAN’s Communications Director, Ahna is passionate about building communications and strategies to further PAN’s work for a just, thriving food and agriculture system. Ahna holds a Master of Science in sustainable agriculture and sociology from Iowa State University, and has worked as community organizer, researcher, coalition-builder, publisher, and communicator.

Jane Kuhn's picture

A farmer's perspective: Responding to climate change

On the small, mixed-fruit orchard I farm along California's Central Coast, confused apple trees spurt scattered blossoms in December, signaling that the weather patterns of yesteryear are being replaced by something new. With increasing drought, heat and disease pressure, any farmer will attest to the challenging impacts of climate change these days.

Jane Kuhn
Linda Wells's picture

Why farmers oppose the Monsanto mega-merger

National poll results released this week confirm that farmers across the country believe the merger of Bayer and Monsanto will be bad for farming and farm communities. As the Department of Justice considers its final decision regarding the merger, the poll demonstrates serious concern from farmers and some details about why many believe more consolidation will be harmful.

Linda Wells
Pesticide Action Network's picture

Native voices on food and farming

PAN board member Kyle Powys Whyte holds the Timnick Chair in the Humanities at Michigan State University. He is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Community Sustainability and a member of the Potawatomi Nation. PAN’s Executive Director Kristin Schafer recently chatted with Kyle about Indigenous food sovereignty and how PAN’s work intersects with his own.

Pesticide Actio...
Margaret Reeves's picture

EPA weakens worker protections. Senators fight back.

In October 2015, we celebrated with farmworker unions and advocates when a much-improved Worker Protection Standard (WPS) was approved. The WPS is the only federal rule that protects farmworkers from exposure to hazardous pesticides on the job, and hadn't been updated in more than 20 years.

Not surprisingly, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently announced that it is planning to put the new rules on hold.

Margaret Reeves