GE test fields = heavy pesticide use

GE test fields = heavy pesticide use


How does pesticide use on Hawai'i GE test fields compare to the mainland? You'd be surprised. Learn More »

Fast track the TPP?

Fast track the TPP?

The largest trade deal in history is being negotiated behind closed doors. Urge Congress to open the TPP to public scrutiny and debate. Take Action »

Brain-harming pesticide has got to go!

Brain-harming pesticide has got to go!

Scientists have known for years that chlorpyrifos can harm children’s developing brains. Tell EPA that action is long overdue. Sign the petition »

Give a little love, each month

Give a little love, each month

Make a monthly pledge to PAN today and help us create a safer food system. Your grocery bag will thank you. Donate »

EPA & USDA: Fix your broken systems

EPA & USDA: Fix your broken systems

When it comes to GE crops and pesticides, USDA and EPA are putting corporate interests above farmers and public health. Tell them to stop. Act now »

Marcia Ishii-Eiteman's blog
By Marcia Ishii-Eiteman,

If you’ve been following the recent big news about Monsanto’s infamous weedkiller RoundUp and cancer, you’ll have heard that industry’s “dirty little secret” just got dirtier.

In case you missed it: the international scientific community sent us two very loud wake-up calls last month. First, the UN World Health Organization’s prestigious International Agency for Research on Cancer released a consensus report that glyphosate, the active ingredient in RoundUp, is a “probable carcinogen.” A few days later, a team of international scientists based in New Zealand reported that widely available commercial formulations of RoundUp, 2,4-D and dicamba can lead to the development of antibiotic resistance in common disease-causing bacteria.

Margaret Reeves's blog
By Margaret Reeves,

I’ve been an earthworm fan for decades. At my Oakland, California home I dump vegetable scraps into a big plastic bin with worms. Once or twice a year I collect incredibly rich worm compost, teaming with roly-poly bugs (isopods), worms — and billions of critters I can’t see. My garden plants love it, and it’s free.

In agricultural soils, worms (different kinds, but worms nevertheless) can contribute significantly to soil respiration with a direct and sharp increase in the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) released, as the number and length of worm canals increases. It turns out this soil respiration is critical to plant health.

Paul Towers's blog
By Paul Towers,

Should parents, families and teachers be warned when hazardous and volatile pesticides are used next door? That was the question before a panel of experts in California last week. Their answer may provide the basis for critical new rules for use of pesticide fumigants, and any neighbor’s right to know.

Fumigant pesticides are a problem for the Golden State. They are highly volatile, likely to drift and linked to a wide range of health impacts, including cancer. Yet every year, over 40 million pounds of these soil-sterilizing chemicals are used on California fields.

Pesticide Action Network's blog
By Pesticide Action Network,

In the first study of its kind, researchers have linked pesticide residues on food with poor semen quality. The new study adds to a growing body of evidence tying very low-level chemical exposures with reproductive and other health harms.

Scientists from Harvard University's School of Public Health found that men who ate fruits and vegetables with higher levels of pesticide residues had fewer normal sperm and a lower sperm count than men who ate produce with lower residue levels.

Pesticide Action Network's blog
By Pesticide Action Network,

Each year at the end of March we join partners across the country celebrating National Farmworker Awareness Week, a nationwide event honoring farmworkers and their families. The celebration culminates today, on Cesar Chavez Day.

A week set aside to raise awareness about the more than two million workers who plant, tend and harvest our food is a wonderful opportunity. This year, we invite you to explore — and share — the great resources below as National Farmworker Awareness Week (#NFAW) wraps up.