Stop the DARK Act!

Stop the DARK Act!

Have you heard? Monsanto & Co. are at it again... Tell Congress we have a right to know what’s in our food and how it’s grown. Take action now »

Climate change & agriculture

Climate change & agriculture

A new report from the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change underscores the need for global sustainable agriculture. Learn more »

Beyond autism awareness

Beyond autism awareness

1 in 68 U.S. children is now on the autism spectrum. This Autism Awareness Month, let's talk prevention. Learn more »

Stand with farmworkers!

Stand with farmworkers!

Across the country, communities are finding creative ways to honor and support U.S. farmworkers. Join us »

Change is afoot

Change is afoot

From coast to coast, people are standing up to Monsanto and the rest of the “Big 6.” Your support keeps this important work going. Donate today »

Not lovin’ pesticide drift

Not lovin’ pesticide drift

Join rural Minnesotans in urging McDonald's to keep its promise to grow safe potatoes that don't put their families in harm's way. Take Action »

Kathryn Gilje's picture

Judging by what's unfolded at the end of 2010 and these first few days of 2011, the PAN community is energized as never before to take on chemical company control of government and food. Record numbers of people like you joined PAN to take action (we're near 50,000 strong now and growing fast — that's up from 12,500 just 18 months ago!), and these first days of 2011 have been action packed. On Monday we announced a lawsuit against Arysta, the largest privately-held pesticide corporation in the world, and the state of California — both — over the cancer-causing strawberry pesticide methyl iodide. Alongside the lawsuit we delivered 52,000 requests to incoming Governor Brown urging him to reverse the state's decision to allow that chemical to be used in agriculture.

Pesticide Action Network's picture

Avoiding soil erosion is essential to maintain crop productivity, protect waterways and avoid or slow desertification. In the U.S. and around the world government-sponsored programs have made great progress in mitigating topsoil loss: U.S. soil conservation practices reduced topsoil loss from 3.1 billion tons to 1.9 billion tons between 1982 and 1997, for instance. But the majority of this mitigation has come at a cost. To avoid soil distrubance and the erosion that goes with it, conventional U.S. farmers have relied on herbicide-intensive no-till, polluting waterways and destroying soil microbial life in the process.

Karl Tupper's picture

The suffering caused by years of endosulfan use on cashew plantations in Kerala's Kasaragod district is well known: birth defects, high rates of mental retardation, and delayed puberty, in addition to the hundreds of deaths directly attributed to the antiquated insecticide. Now, the Indian press is reporting another cluster of endosulfan-induced disease a couple hundred miles away in Muthalamada district, also part of the state of Kerala.

Kathryn Gilje's picture

This is a year-end post of gratitude for all of you who offer deep and sustaining nourishment to our world. Gratitude for soil, for the earth’s caretakers, for courageous scientists and persistent agitators. And it is an invitation to join this community at PAN. Because together, we get things done.

This time of year I find myself seeking out the places that remind me what is right with our world. Amidst global tragedy and hourly acts of injustice, our existence depends on connecting with those soul sisters and beings of all kinds who sustain and nourish us with their acts of profound grace and fortitude. One of the key reasons that I am honored and motivated to work with PAN is that I have the chance to meet these people each and every day. Via email, SMS texts, phone calls and evening conversations around kitchen tables, I am regularly reminded of the many people working for ecological sanity, for equity – acting out of profound love and possibility, rather than fear. People speaking truth at times and in places that are risky and deeply needed, both.

Kristin Schafer's picture

Doctors are rolling up their sleeves to search for the causes of autism. Dr. Philip Landrigan announced last week that he's rounding up a scientific posse to identify a "Most Wanted Chemicals" list based on the latest information linking environmental contaminants to Autism Spectrum Disorder. It's high time.