Double your dollars!

Double your dollars!

Our Board of Directors has offered to match your gift, dollar for dollar, up to the first $6,000 donated. Donate Today »

Theo Colborn  1927-2014

Theo Colborn 1927-2014

Scientist, activist and truthteller, Dr. Colborn spurred the public conversation on endocrine disrupting chemicals. We are so grateful for her pioneering work. Memorial on Grist »

30 years later

30 years later

Bhopal is still waiting for justice, and those corporations responsible for one of the worst industrial accidents in history must still be held to account. Learn more »

Gov. Brown, it’s time to lead on chlorpyrifos

Gov. Brown, it’s time to lead on chlorpyrifos

More than 1 million pounds of chlorpyrifos are used in California fields every year. CA residents, tell Gov. Brown the time for action is now. »

Mr. President: Bees need help, now

Mr. President: Bees need help, now


Urge Obama's new task force to enact real and rapid protections for honey bees.
Act now »

Feeding the World

Feeding the World

What would a food system geared towards eradicating hunger look like? Much like sound farming, it all starts at the roots... Learn more »

Pesticide Action Network's blog
By Pesticide Action Network,

Back in January, we let you know about an opportunity to add your voice to the growing public and scientific momentum to ban triclosan – a toxic, persistent chemical found in 75% of Americans – from everyday products. The EPA has extended the deadline to receive public comment on its upcoming decision until April 8.

Pesticide Action Network's blog
By Pesticide Action Network,

Today, March 30, in Baltimore, and continuing through April 7 to Berkeley, the documentary Bhopali is touring to raise awareness and support. Max Carlson's award-winning film explores the ongoing legacy of the Bhopal disaster and features Indian and international activists, including Noam Chomsky. You may view the dramatic trailer and get tour details from Students for Bhopal.

Karl Tupper's blog
By Karl Tupper,

A few weeks ago, California's Department of Pesticide Regulation announced the launch of a new, "first of its kind" air monitoring network designed to look for pesticides drifting into populated areas in the state's fertile agricultural valleys. Weekly samples will be collected over the course of a year in three communities: Shafter, Salinas, and Ripon. Each will be analyzed for 34 pesticides including many neurotoxic insecticides and highly toxic fumigants like methyl iodide. It's an ambitious project, and it's sure to yield a ton of interesting data, yet I just can't get excited about it because: a) PAN's been doing a version of this for years; and b) lack of data isn't the problem at this point.

Marcia Ishii-Eiteman's blog
By Marcia Ishii-Eiteman,

Cherry blossoms are in full bloom here in Washington D.C. where I’ve spent the last few days participating in the Ecumenical Advocacy Days’ national conference for Global Peace with Justice. Along with some 700 participants, I heard inspiring stories of social justice work being carried out by communities of faith in the U.S. and around the world. Also on display were two under-appreciated facts that the U.S. food movement is slowly coming to appreciate: 1) the deep ties of communities of faith are critical to social change-making; and 2) women farmers are and will remain the real roots of global agriculture.

Kristin Schafer's blog
By Kristin Schafer,

As evidence linking pollutants and cancer becomes increasingly clear, scientists around the world are calling for something to be done — and they're getting downright pushy about it.

Well maybe not pushy, exactly. But definitely pointed and impatient as they urge policymakers to take steps now to protect us from chemicals that cause cancer.