Climate change & agriculture

Climate change & agriculture

A new report from the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change underscores the need for global sustainable agriculture. Learn more »

Beyond autism awareness

Beyond autism awareness

1 in 68 U.S. children is now on the autism spectrum. This Autism Awareness Month, let's talk prevention. Learn more »

Stand with farmworkers!

Stand with farmworkers!

Across the country, communities are finding creative ways to honor and support U.S. farmworkers. Join us »

Change is afoot

Change is afoot

From coast to coast, people are standing up to Monsanto and the rest of the “Big 6.” Your support keeps this important work going. Donate today »

Label GE food

Label GE food

Californians overwhelmingly support labeling genetically engineered food. Let’s make it happen! Urge your State Senator to support SB 1381. Take action »

Not lovin’ pesticide drift

Not lovin’ pesticide drift

Join rural Minnesotans in urging McDonald's to keep its promise to grow safe potatoes that don't put their families in harm's way. Take Action »

Karl Tupper's picture

In my family Thanksgiving means cranberries, sweet potatoes, and green bean casserole. So I decided to check these foods out on WhatsOnMyFood.org. The results weren’t exactly appetizing. Here’s what the USDA found, after washing:

Green beans: 44 different pesticides with the most commonly detected being acephate, a highly neurotoxic organophosphate insecticide. One sample had 200 micrograms of it per 100 gram serving (slightly more than one cup). That may not sound like a lot, but it's twice the EPA's level of concern for children. 

Karl Tupper's picture

The New York Times is reporting that Stephen Johnson, head of the Environmental Protection Agency under Bush, has joined the board of directors of Scotts Miracle-Gro. The company is the world's largest producer of chemicals for the lawn care and garden sectors.

Not that this should come as a shock — we've long noted the cozy relationships between agencies like EPA and the companies they're supposed to regulate. And the EPA under Johnson was particularly friendly to the pesticide industry. Some examples:

Kristin Schafer's picture

On Capitol Hill today, the chemical industry squashed a bi-partisan effort to ban the controversial chemical bisphenol-A (BPA) from baby bottles and children's drinking cups. Really guys?

Protecting kids from toxic chemicals should be a no-brainer, right? Especially when the science is so strong, the scientists themselves are calling for action.

Pesticide Action Network's picture

Farmworkers, farmers and eaters have joined together to change the face of U.S. agriculture. The Fair Food Project focuses on both the serious need for change as well innovations leading that change—bringing wholesome food and farming back home, to our tables, one family farm at a time.    

There’s no better time to celebrate and recognize these innovators than Thanksgiving, and this one in particular.

Pesticide Action Network's picture

"Stop raising doubt where there is consensus." "Take an online course in epidemiology!" These were but two of the admonitions scientists and malariologists directed at Africa Fighting Malaria's representative at a Geneva symposium on malaria last week.

Richard Tren, who spoke at the meeting for Africa Fighting Malaria (AFM), is an economist by training whose public career has included manufacturing doubt about climate change as well as spreading misinformation about the effectiveness of DDT in controlling malaria.