| Pesticide Action Network
Reclaiming the future of food and farming
Kristin Schafer's picture

Fewer pesticides, healthier kids

It's that time of year! Freshly scrubbed, nervous-looking kids don backpacks, pack lunches and head off to school.

This back-to-school season there's both excellent and not-so-great news when it comes to schoolkids and pesticides. On balance, it's fair to say there's exciting progress afoot for children's health — from pesticide-free school lunches to a nasty brain-harming chemical finally getting the boot.

Kristin Schafer
Pesticide Action Network's picture

Farmworker protections? On their way — finally.

As we celebrate Labor Day this year, too many of this country's 80 million workers still don't receive fair wages or adequate workplace protections — including workers on farms across the country. But there's a change coming for farmworkers, with stronger workplace protections on the horizon.

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Margaret Reeves's picture

Healthy soils, resilient farms

Innovative farmers and ranchers have, for generations, deliberately invested in building soil health. And this year — with the UN’s International Year of Soils and implementation of California's Healthy Soil Initiative well underway — we'll be pressing policymakers to turn innovation for healthy soil into standard practice.

The timing could not be better. Widespread implementation of practices that build and protect soil health is the only certain thing that will ensure farmers’ ability to both mitigate and adapt to worsening conditions associated with climate change. California's historic drought provides a dramatic case in point.

Margaret Reeves

Linda Wells

Position: 
Midwest Director of Organizing

Linda joined PAN in winter 2011, bringing nearly a decade of organizing experience with environmental and economic justice issues. Before PAN, Linda's environmental work focused on protecting endangered ecosystems through marketplace campaigns with ForestEthics. Linda is also a co-founder of the nationwide Hand in Hand — the domestic employers association, which seeks to create fair working conditions for domestic workers.

Devika Ghai

Position: 
Organizer

Devika grew up on a small farm in Northern India where her parents continue to grow most of their own food using traditional ecological farming practices. Upon moving to the U.S. she was appalled and mobilized as she learned about food waste, and the health and livelihood harms inherent in our global agricultural system. As a student, Devika organized and led campus workers' rights and ecological sustainability initiatives, helping to build strong multi-racial alliances around these and other social and environmental justice campaigns.

Medha Chandra

Position: 
Campaign Coordinator

Medha has 16 years experience in urban design, environmental protection, international development and social justice work in India, the UK, and in the U.S. Before moving to the U.S., Medha worked on environmental conflict and justice issues in India and the UK, focusing on low income urban and peri-urban communities. At PAN North America, Medha leads a team focused on international and domestic pesticide campaigns, and is the coordinator of PAN International’s Working Group on Pesticides and Corporations. Medha has written for academic as well as NGO publications.

Pesticide Action Network's picture

Pesticides in your food? Watch your sperm count.

In the first study of its kind, researchers have linked pesticide residues on food with poor semen quality. The new study adds to a growing body of evidence tying very low-level chemical exposures with reproductive and other health harms.

Scientists from Harvard University's School of Public Health found that men who ate fruits and vegetables with higher levels of pesticide residues had fewer normal sperm and a lower sperm count than men who ate produce with lower residue levels.

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