Drift happens

Drift happens

Tell EPA their new “spray drift” rules need to be stronger. It’s high time to protect rural kids from drifting pesticides. Take action »

Build buzz for bees

Build buzz for bees

Bees are responsible for one in three bites of food we eat, and they're still in trouble. But with your support, we're building powerful momentum to protect them! Donate today »

Stop the DARK Act!

Stop the DARK Act!

Have you heard? Monsanto & Co. are at it again... Tell Congress we have a right to know what’s in our food and how it’s grown. Take action now »

Climate change & agriculture

Climate change & agriculture

A new report from the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change underscores the need for global sustainable agriculture. Learn more »

Beyond autism awareness

Beyond autism awareness

1 in 68 U.S. children is now on the autism spectrum. This Autism Awareness Month, let's talk prevention. Learn more »

Stand with farmworkers!

Stand with farmworkers!

Across the country, communities are finding creative ways to honor and support U.S. farmworkers. Join us »

Kristin Schafer's picture

When I worked in Kenya many years ago, I visited a small farm where they processed chrysanthemums for use as a natural pest killer. I vividly remember the powerful, not unpleasant smell rising from the mesh shelves where the flowers were drying in the sun.

You'd think a pesticide based on flowers would be harmless, right? The promoters of synthetic pyrethroids — which mimic the natural pyrethrum extracted from chrysanthemums — certainly want us to think so. But once again, the latest batch of "safer" pesticides are not as harmless as we thought, and pose particular risks to children. Unfortunately, EPA seems to be turning a blind eye to emerging evidence, and is poised to open the floodgates to more pyrethroid products and uses.

Pesticide Action Network's picture

The online journal PLoS One released two bee studies last week: one on an old parasite newly found in honey bees, the other confirming that bees are being poisoned by the controversial pesticide clothianidin in and around the 88 million acres of U.S. countryside planted with treated corn seeds. 

Pesticide Action Network's picture

Opposition to cancer-causing methyl iodide is at a fever pitch in California, a year after the Schwarzenegger Administration approved the chemical for use in the state.

As Gov. Jerry Brown considers action on methyl iodide in 2012, as well as the appointment of a new chief pesticide regulator, it’s worth reflecting on PAN's efforts to ensure safe strawberries over the past year.

Marcia Ishii-Eiteman's picture

You’ve all heard the news: farmers across the country are losing their fields to superweeds so formidable and fast-spreading that they break farm machinery and render millions of acres of farmland useless. These superweeds have evolved as a direct consequence of Monsanto’s RoundUp Ready pesticide-seed package. Now superbugs are emerging, resistant to Monsanto’s transgenic insecticidal crops. Ecologists predicted this ecological disaster 15 years ago.

Chela Vazquez's picture

Acabamos de vivir momentos muy emocionantes el 3-6 de diciembre, 2011, en Bangalore, India.  Frente a cientos de campesinos, trabajadores agrícolas, comunidades indígenas y rurales, y testigos de cinco continentes, un jurado del Tribunal Permanente de los Pueblos (Permanent People’s Tribunal o PPT por su siglas en Inglés), pronunció su veredicto en contra de las compañías agroquímicas transnacionales que fabrican y venden plaguicidas altamente tóxicos, producen semillas transgénicas, y controlan la agricultura a nivel mundial.