Fast track the TPP?

Fast track the TPP?

The largest trade deal in history is being negotiated behind closed doors. Urge Congress to open the TPP to public scrutiny and debate. Take Action »

Brain-harming pesticide has got to go!

Brain-harming pesticide has got to go!

Scientists have known for years that chlorpyrifos can harm children’s developing brains. Tell EPA that action is long overdue. Sign the petition »

Give a little love, each month

Give a little love, each month

Make a monthly pledge to PAN today and help us create a safer food system. Your grocery bag will thank you. Donate »

20 years makes a huge difference

20 years makes a huge difference


Until it doesn't. The rules protecting farmworkers haven't been updated in 20 years. Urge EPA to act »

EPA & USDA: Fix your broken systems

EPA & USDA: Fix your broken systems

When it comes to GE crops and pesticides, USDA and EPA are putting corporate interests above farmers and public health. Tell them to stop. Act now »

Paul Towers's blog
By Paul Towers,


As I strolled through downtown Ashland, Oregon, last week, I was struck by how many “Yes on 92” signs and stickers I saw. There is clear, visible support from businesses and individuals for the measure to label genetically engineered (GE) foods.

And as the measure heads for a vote on November 4, industrial agriculture groups are pulling out all the stops to keep this ballot initiative from winning. Even so, there is an incredible groundswell of support for labeling GE food in Oregon and beyond. Things are looking hopeful!

Kristin Schafer's blog
By Kristin Schafer,

Two weeks ago today, I was heading south for the inaugural "ShiftCon" gathering in Los Angeles. It was a fascinating event, attracting hundreds of women (and a handful of men) committed to "Shifting the Conversation" about health, wellness and the environment through social media activism.

My top two takeaways left me feeling optimistic. The first relates directly to our campaign work here at PAN: the pesticide problem is now front and center in the conversation about GE crops, and the link between the two is crystal clear. This is hugely encouraging. And the second? It may be obvious, but at ShiftCon it was palpable: the social media world is an astonishingly active and powerful place.

Linda Wells's blog
By Linda Wells,

It's official. EPA and USDA have both evaluated Dow Chemical's new line of 2,4-D-resistant seeds, Enlist, and have approved both the seeds and the accompanying pesticide formulation for market.

This is a turning point, not just for grain production, but for food production in the U.S. and internationally. The introduction of Enlist corn and soybeans, and the widespread adoption of this new seed line, will have pervasive impacts on farmer livelihoods, public health and control of our food system.

Sara Knight's blog
By Sara Knight,

Pesticide corporation Syngenta is pushing the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to allow even more use of one of its bee-harming neonicotinoids, thiamethoxam. But with science clearly showing that neonics harm bees and other pollinators — contributing to dramatic die-offs in recent years — allowing increased use of this chemical would be a striking move in the wrong direction.

If EPA grants the request, more thiamethoxam will be applied to common crops — including corn, soybeans, wheat and alfalfa — that cover over 250 million acres of U.S. farmland, much of it in the Midwest. The proposed residue level increases vary by crop, but some would go up by as much as 400 times what is currently allowed.

Emily Marquez's blog
By Emily Marquez,

Last week, California's Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR) released new data from its statewide Air Monitoring Network (AMN). As you've heard from us before, pesticide drift can seriously impact the health and well being of people living in rural communities.

And it is happening. Even with DPR's flawed sampling plan, this latest round of data confirms health-harming drift at monitoring sites across the state. Of the 32 pesticides and five breakdown products assessed, 24 were detected at least once. At one site, the neurotoxic insecticide chlorpyrifos was found in 75% of the air samples taken.