Bees need help

Bees need help

Tell EPA to include neonic-treated seeds in its pollinator protection plan. Comment period extended, you can still speak up!
Take action »

Keep California kids healthy

Keep California kids healthy

Tell the state's Department of Pesticide Regulation you want stronger rules on how and when pesticides are applied near schools. Act now »

Time to stop this pesticide treadmill

Time to stop this pesticide treadmill

Global health experts say the key ingredient in Monsanto’s RoundUp is a "probable human carcinogen." Be part of the solution. Donate today »

Iowa farmers tackle drift

Iowa farmers tackle drift

Iowans are pressing for stronger policies to protect farmers, communities and local food systems from drifting pesticides.
Learn more »

GE test fields = heavy pesticide use

GE test fields = heavy pesticide use


How does pesticide use on Hawai'i GE test fields compare to the mainland? You'd be surprised. Learn more »

Heather Pilatic's blog
By Heather Pilatic,

Bees are still dying and EPA is still sitting on its hands. Luckily for those of us who like to eat, scientists have been hard at work cracking the "mystery" of colony collapse disorder (CCD). Today two new studies were published in Science, strengthening the case that neonicotinoid pesticides are indeed key drivers behind recent pollinator declines.

Pesticide Action Network's blog
By Pesticide Action Network,

Timing is everything. On March 20, Arysta LifeScience pulled its cancer-causing pesticide, methyl iodide, from the U.S. market. The decision came after years of public outcry against the undue influence that Arysta, the largest privately held pesticide corporation in the world, had on science and governance during the rulemaking.

Interestingly enough, Arysta's decision was announced on the eve of a critical hearing in the methyl iodide lawsuit that Earthjustice and California Rural Legal Assistance filed on behalf of Pesticide Action Network, farmworkers, Californians for Pesticide Reform and many others.

Kathryn Gilje's blog
By Kathryn Gilje,

After years of promoting their controversial pesticide in the face of scientific and public opposition, Arysta LifeScience has pulled cancer-causing methyl iodide off the U.S. market.

The Tuesday evening announcement ends use in this country of what scientists have called "one of the most toxic chemicals on earth."

Marcia Ishii-Eiteman's blog
By Marcia Ishii-Eiteman,

As if the disaster of RoundUp resistant superweeds sweeping our farmland weren’t enough, Monsanto is now preparing to launch an even greater disaster: a new soybean engineered to be resistant to the older, more toxic weedkiller, dicamba. The seed — which Monsanto plans to market in 2014 if approved — will also come stacked with the company’s RoundUp Ready gene, and is designed to be used with Monsanto’s proprietary herbicide “premix” of dicamba and glyphosate.

More dicamba-tolerant crops (corn, cotton, canola) are all waiting in the wings. If this new generation of GE crops is approved, then dicamba use will surge, just as it did with RoundUp. And we all know how well that didn't work out. 

Pesticide Action Network's blog
By Pesticide Action Network,

Today, PAN joined beekeepers and partners Beyond Pesticides and Center for Food Safety in filing a legal petition that calls on EPA to suspend registration of Bayer’s controversial bee-toxic pesticide, clothianidin.

We also delivered over a million signatures from individuals around the world — including over 20,000 PAN supporters — calling on EPA to take decisive action to protect honey bees from neonicotinoid pesticides before it is too late.