Theo Colborn  1927-2014

Theo Colborn 1927-2014

Scientist, activist and truthteller, Dr. Colborn spurred the public conversation on endocrine disrupting chemicals. We are so grateful for her pioneering work. Memorial on Grist »

For the bees!

For the bees!

With your help, PAN will keep working for bee-protective policies and a thriving, just food system that’s healthier for us all. Donate today »

30 years later

30 years later

Bhopal is still waiting for justice, and those corporations responsible for one of the worst industrial accidents in history must still be held to account. Learn more »

Gov. Brown, it’s time to lead on chlorpyrifos

Gov. Brown, it’s time to lead on chlorpyrifos

More than 1 million pounds of chlorpyrifos are used in California fields every year. CA residents, tell Gov. Brown the time for action is now. »

Mr. President: Bees need help, now

Mr. President: Bees need help, now


Urge Obama's new task force to enact real and rapid protections for honey bees.
Act now »

Feeding the World

Feeding the World

What would a food system geared towards eradicating hunger look like? Much like sound farming, it all starts at the roots... Learn more »

Kathryn Gilje's blog
By Kathryn Gilje,

Last week in Peru 90 people were poisoned and at least three children died from donated food contaminated with pesticides. A horrifying example of the on-the-ground consequences of broken policy.

If only this were an isolated incident. But the reality is, tragedies like this happen because the rules on pesticides just don't workNot in the U.S., and not in many countries around the world.

Marcia Ishii-Eiteman's blog
By Marcia Ishii-Eiteman,

Sin Maíz, No Hay País!” The chant is ringing out this morning across the fields, villages and towns of Mexico, in recognition of Mexico’s National Day of Corn, September 29. “Without corn, there is no country!” is the literal translation of this ongoing national campaign to celebrate and protect the cultural heritage and significance of corn to the Mexican people.

With the campaign entering its fourth year, Mexicans can also celebrate the good news that the maize that Mexican farmers have been cultivating in traditional farming systems for thousands of years already contains much of the genetic diversity they’ll need to weather the challenges of climate change in the coming century.

Medha Chandra's blog
By Medha Chandra,

I want to share some good news that brightened my day. One of the largest pesticide manufacturers in the world — Bayer CropScience — announced on September 15 that it will withdraw its most hazardous pesticides from the global market. 

This is huge victory for the PAN International network and other NGOs from Europe, Asia, Latin America and Africa who have campaigned for years for Bayer to take this step. While I'm happy that Bayer finally did the right thing, it saddens me that the company waited 16 years to act after it first promised to withdraw these pesticides back in 1995. Who knows how many pesticide poisonings worldwide could have been avoided?

Kristin Schafer's blog
By Kristin Schafer,

There's good news and bad news on the pesticide front this week. Let's take the good news first: A sting operation in New York City got 6,000+ packages of dangerous, illegal rat poison off shop shelves. Hats off to the public servants who got this done!

The bad news comes in two parts: First, the fact that products like this can slip through the cracks of our pesticide control system is downright frightening. And second, industry lawyers are busily weakening one of the few tools EPA officials have to quickly pull pesticide products from the market when they're found to be harmful. Really guys?

Pesticide Action Network's blog
By Pesticide Action Network,

Help start a national conversation on pesticides and bees by spreading the word about this hard-hitting, in-depth investigative report.

Dan Rather's investigative reporting team has produced a follow-up to their 2006 inquiry into Colony Collapse Disorder. Five years later, the situation remains substantively unaddressed by EPA.

Honey bees are still dying off at an average rate of 34% year, and the millions of dollars Congress set aside to investigate the issue has yielded no actionable findings for the federal agencies charged with stemming the tide of honey bee decline.