EPA approves Dow's 2,4-D crops

EPA approves Dow's 2,4-D crops

Despite incredible public outcry, USDA and EPA approved Dow's new 2,4-D crops. Help continue the fight against GE crops that boost toxic pesticide use! Donate today »

Mr. President: Bees need help, now

Mr. President: Bees need help, now


Urge Obama's new task force to enact real and rapid protections for honey bees.
Act now »

Feeding the World

Feeding the World

What would a food system geared towards eradicating hunger look like? Much like sound farming, it all starts at the roots... Learn more »

Not lovin’ pesticide drift

Not lovin’ pesticide drift

Join rural Minnesotans in urging McDonald's to keep its promise to grow safe potatoes that don't put their families in harm's way. Take action »

Marcia Ishii-Eiteman's blog
By Marcia Ishii-Eiteman,

Warning! Nina Federoff — former “Science and Technology Advisor” to the U.S. State Department and well-known genetic engineering apologist — is back on her soapbox. In an Op Ed published in the New York Times last week, Federoff strings together one blazing falsehood after another, extolling the virtues of a technology that much of the rest of the world has rightly rejected. What is behind her evangelical commitment to this particular technology? Let’s take a look.

Pesticide Action Network's blog
By Pesticide Action Network,

With peak fumigation season in California just weeks away, efforts to prohibit the use of cancer-causing methyl iodide in the state’s strawberry fields have taken on a new level of urgency.

PAN joins partners today in Sacramento in staging a mock “fumigation” on the Capitol’s west steps at 12:30pm to underscore the dangers posed by methyl iodide, and to keep the heat on Governor Jerry Brown. Dressed in “moon suits” and wearing gas masks, participants will simulate the process for fumigating strawberry fields: injecting the liquid pesticide into the ground – where it volatizes and becomes a gas – and sealing it into the soil with black tarps.

Pesticide Action Network's blog
By Pesticide Action Network,

Dupont's new systemic herbicides, designed to keep turf grass free of troublesome weeds, seem to pose little direct danger to human health. But it turns out they do kill trees.

After receiving more than 7,000 reports of damaged or killed trees in states throughout the midwest, last week EPA ordered Dupont to immediately "halt the sale, use or distribution" of the company's herbicide Imprelis.

Chloe Schwabe's blog
By Chloe Schwabe,

In early June, I had the incredible opportunity to represent PAN at the 25th anniversary celebration of the Colectivo Ecologista Jalisco (CEJ) in Guadalajara, Mexico. 

Over the course of my three days at the celebration, I learned how the 20-year partnership between PAN and CEJ has transformed local, national and international pesticide policies, as well as the health of farmlands and the environment in this region of Mexico. But most importantly, I learned how the collaborative work has transformed people’s lives.

Margaret Reeves's blog
By Margaret Reeves,

Soils are the Earth’s largest carbon storage depot after oceans and fossil fuels. Yet scientists estimate that since the industrial revolution, agricultural practices have caused massive carbon losses from the soil, contributing up to a third of all the increased CO2 in the global atmosphere.

But there's hope for restoring this great carbon sink. The science and practice of ecological farming now show that farmers can effectively put carbon back into the soil – and that this, in turn, can be a huge help in the battle against climate change.