Final Farm Bill Misses Opportunity to Advance Future of Food & Farming | Pesticide Action Network
Reclaiming the future of food and farming

Final Farm Bill Misses Opportunity to Advance Future of Food & Farming

Farm Bill and farmers

Washington, DC - Following a swift passage by the Senate (87-13) on Tuesday, the U.S. House (386-47) passed the conference version of the $867 billion farm bill with bipartisan support earlier today. The bill will have lasting and dramatic effects across the food & farm chain.

Debates over the preceding nine months focused on reducing access to food stamps, gutting major environmental laws, addressing impacts from President Trump-imposed tariffs, and reform of mega-farm loopholes. Ultimately, most of the worst changes didn’t make the cut, but many advocates say that shouldn’t be cause for celebration.

PAN’s Executive Director Kristin Schafer issued the following statement:

“Like many food, farming and hunger groups across the country, we are breathing a sigh of relief today that the 2018 Farm Bill isn’t terrible. Hundreds of thousands of people stood up to tell Congress that the draconian version of the bill initially proposed by the House was completely unacceptable. As a result, access to food stamps (SNAP) was protected and local control of pesticides was retained.”

“The few bright spots in the bill included expanded support for beginning and socially disadvantaged farmers, support for farmers' markets, as well as increased funding for organic research and regional food production.”

“The 2018 Farm Bill was a missed opportunity for real reform, and we’ll keep fighting for food & farm policies that advance the future of food and farming that will serve all Americans, including the most vulnerable.”

 

Contact:

Paul Towers, ptowers@panna.org, 916-216-1082

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At Pesticide Action Network (PAN) North America, we work to create a just, thriving food system. For too long, pesticide and biotech corporations have dictated how we grow food, placing the health and economic burdens of pesticide use on farmers, farmworkers and rural communities. PAN works with those on the frontlines to tackle the pesticide problem — and reclaim the future of food and farming.