Reclaiming the future of food and farming
Kamyar Enshayan's picture

Guest blog: Speaking up about Iowa's pesticide problem

Earlier this month I had the opportunity to present a workshop on pesticides at the National Environmental Health Association’s Region 4 gathering in Waterloo, Iowa. I focused in on the public health problems caused by heavy pesticide use in Iowa — and the need to shift to safer alternatives.

I also highlighted the urgency of supporting solutions, and specifically the importance of PAN’s work with farmer groups in the state to put policies in place that protect farmers and rural families from pesticide exposures.

Kamyar Enshayan
Lex Horan's picture

Turning up the heat on McDonald's

Last Tuesday at lunchtime, I stood on the sidewalk outside a McDonald’s in St. Paul, facing the busy traffic on University Avenue with a colorful sign that said “Stop the Drift.” I was with a group of other supporters of the Toxic Taters Coalition: students, parents and community members who made time in their day to stand in solidarity with rural communities combatting pesticide drift.

Lex Horan
Margaret Reeves's picture

On-the-job protections for farmworkers — finally!

Monday was a great day for the nation’s two million farmworkers and their families. On September 28, EPA released its long-awaited improved rules for the protection of farmworkers from on-the-job exposure to hazardous pesticides.

While we didn't get everything we hoped for, the rules are now much, much stronger than they've been for the past 20 years. And that’s a real victory!

Margaret Reeves
Marcia Ishii-Eiteman's picture

Diversifying crops, democratizing food

Extended drought in California, freeze warnings in Oregon, flooding in the Southeast…. Today’s mounting environmental stresses of extreme and unpredictably shifting patterns in the weather, along with exhausted soil, resistant “superweeds” and pollinator losses, are taking a toll on farms across the country.

These stressors, many brought on or exacerbated by the destructive practices of industrialized farming, are also giving us a pretty clear warning that our approach to farming is going to have to change — significantly and fast. 

Marcia Ishii-Eiteman